Opinion on Utilities in United States

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Type Product title / description Pub Price
Expert View
Expert View

Cross-industry private sector alliance needed in the push for electric vehicles

Facing a lower forecasted demand for electricity and the increased penetration of renewable energy, US executives at the Global Power Markets conference have indicated their intention to target electric vehicles as a future source of revenue. Given the many challenges to widespread adoption of electric vehicles, comprehensive cross-industry collaboration is required to make this shift a reality.

Published By Datamonitor
18 May 2010
Expert View
Expert View

Datamonitor on Copenhagen, the "plot to kill Kyoto" and carrots and sticks

At Copenhagen, the world will look to China and the US to overcome economic and political hurdles and set the agenda for a meaningful global climate effort. However, with China unwilling to commit to hard emissions targets and the US unlikely to overcome its zero-sum mindset suspicious of burden-sharing, Datamonitor examines a third, albeit equally contentious, 'carrots and sticks' approach.

Published By Datamonitor
06 Oct 2009
CommentWire
CommentWire

Detroit Edison: cutting summer demand, no sweat

Published By Datamonitor
16 May 2001
CommentWire
CommentWire

DPL: a tempting buy for E.ON

Consolidation is certain to happen in the US utility industry, with safe regulated businesses being the current stock market favorites. DPL would be a good acquisition for a European utility that could maximize its regulated return on investment through cost control.

Published By Datamonitor
19 Apr 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy/Enron: tortoise 1 hare 0

Dynegy, backed by its part-owner ChevronTexaco, could benefit from gaining Enron's assets at a fire-sale price. The energy trader, once darling of the markets, is trying to cling onto survival after financial irregularities brought on a startling fall from grace. But Dynegy should bear in mind the potential difficulties in integrating two very different companies.

Published By Datamonitor
08 Nov 2001
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy: change at the top

ChevronTexaco has appointed a senior ChevronTexaco executive to the position of chairman, signaling the oil major's increased role in the troubled energy trader. While a takeover is possible, for now ChevronTexaco should focus on getting Dynergy back on track after falling credibility amongst energy trading companies.

Published By Datamonitor
29 May 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy: hoping it's hit rock bottom

US energy trader Dynegy's $450 million pretax restructuring charge has brought a 10% drop in the company's share price. Like many other energy traders, Dynegy has tried to increase liquidity and stabilize its balance sheet in the light of regulatory pressure and investor disappointment - but the company's situation just seems to get worse.

Published By Datamonitor
25 Jun 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy: quitting energy trading worldwide

The downturn in the energy trading market has claimed another victim: Dynegy is retreating from wholesale energy marketing and trading worldwide. The company will refocus and step away from capital-intensive businesses to reduce borrowing. As yet another company leaves the market, concerns will increase in Europe over liquidity and volatility, with the market controlled by fewer large players.

Published By Datamonitor
21 Oct 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy: still in trouble

Last week's moves at Dynegy look like the work of new CEO Glenn Tilton, drafted in by major shareholder ChevronTexaco to get the struggling Texas energy trader back on track. Mr Tilton faces an uphill battle, however, as the US energy trading industry remains deep in crisis.

Published By Datamonitor
24 Jun 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

Dynegy: struggling to survive

The fortunes of former energy giant Dynegy continue to go from bad to worse: if its share price does not rise above $1, it could be delisted from the Exchange. Regaining investor confidence will be a tough task, and its extremely weak position rather thwarts its ability to negotiate when selling assets. The company's future is not looking promising.

Published By Datamonitor
15 Nov 2002

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