Latest Intelligence on Infectious Diseases in Europe

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Type Product title / description Pub Price
CommentWire
CommentWire

Gilead: Hepsera gains EU approval

The launch of Hepsera in Europe will go some way to meeting the high levels of unmet clinical need in the hepatitis B market. However, there remains significant commercial potential for novel market entrants, and rapid growth will be driven by increased physician uptake of new products.

Published By Datamonitor
12 Mar 2003
CommentWire
CommentWire

GlaxoSmithKline: H1N1 hype unfounded as UK caps vaccine order

Following poor uptake of the vaccine in several European markets, the UK Department of Health has opted to limit its H1N1 contract with GlaxoSmithKline to 34.8 million doses. Despite the media hype surrounding the influenza outbreak, the mild course of the pandemic and negative public opinion of the vaccine means that its commercial impact will be significantly reduced.

Published By Datamonitor
08 Apr 2010
CommentWire
CommentWire

GlaxoSmithKline: strengthening R&D in anti-infectives

In response to a relatively empty anti-infectives pipeline and increasing competitive pressure from other companies active in this market, GlaxoSmithKline has entered into a collaboration with Anacor Pharmaceuticals for the development of novel antibacterials and antivirals. The deal highlights GlaxoSmithKline's continued interest in the anti-infectives area.

Published By Datamonitor
10 Oct 2007
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK and Roche: UK government orders flu drugs

The UK government has bought enough of Roche's and GlaxoSmithKline's antivirals to treat half of the country's population, in an attempt to fortify itself in case of an influenza pandemic. However, this may not be the best strategy for preventing high mortality in the event of a crisis.

Published By Datamonitor
30 Jan 2009
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK: cutting HIV drug prices could be a good move

The foundation hopes to mobilize public opinion in GSK's largest markets, forcing the company to cut anti-HIV prices in the developing world. This may not be necessary. As developed HIV markets become saturated, it may well be in GSK and its rivals' direct interests to build their presence in developing markets by selling cheaper drugs there.

Published By Datamonitor
13 Feb 2002
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK: experimental AIDS drug shows potent antiviral activity in human trial

A Phase IIa study has revealed that an experimental integrase inhibitor being developed by GlaxoSmithKline has decreased the AIDS virus to undetectable levels in 70% of patients. With this drug showing impressive potential, and given the company's extensive HIV franchise, GSK now has the opportunity to develop a potent fixed dose combination.

Published By Datamonitor
23 Jul 2009
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK: new development deal shores up pipeline

Published By Datamonitor
25 Jul 2001
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK: renewing the HIV pipeline

GlaxoSmithKline and Idenix are to co-develop IDX899 for the treatment of HIV infection. Despite having eight marketed HIV products, GSK lost its position as market leader to Gilead in 2007. The new collaboration with Idenix will, however, help the company to maintain its share in the fiercely competitive HIV market.

Published By Datamonitor
09 Feb 2009
CommentWire
CommentWire

GSK: UK's decision to choose Cervarix most likely based on price

GlaxoSmithKline has been awarded a UK government contract to supply its cervical cancer vaccine Cervarix for a national immunization campaign, although alternative treatment Gardasil has the advantage of being indicated for the prevention of both cervical cancer and genital warts. With both vaccines boasting a similarly good clinical profile, this decision is most likely based on price.

Published By Datamonitor
19 Jun 2008
CommentWire
CommentWire

Hepatitis A vaccine: more protection than expected

A new study suggests the hepatitis A vaccine may provide immunity for over 20 years. A new Swiss study predicts that two doses of the hepatitis A vaccine will provide immunity for over 20 years. This is longer than previously thought.<BR />

Published By Datamonitor
13 Dec 2002

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