Latest Intelligence on Consumer Packaged Goods in Sweden

Published within

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Type Product title / description Pub Price
CommentWire
CommentWire

Alcohol trade: legal changes to benefit Swedish drinkers

The European Commission has told Sweden it must relax its laws concerning alcohol purchases from abroad, on the grounds that they currently constitute a barrier to trade. While the move will undoubtedly delight Swedish natives, one market set to reap the benefit will be Denmark - especially Carlsberg [CARLb.CO].

Published By Datamonitor
22 Oct 2003
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Bottled water: half of UK bottled water sales are on the go

Published By Datamonitor
06 Aug 2001
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Carbonated drinks: French drink the highest proportion on-the-go

Published By Datamonitor
21 Feb 2002
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Cereal bars: ce-real deal

Published By Datamonitor
21 Mar 2005
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Cereal bars: Swedes eat more than anyone else

Published By Datamonitor
08 Jan 2003
CommentWire
CommentWire

Coca-Cola: vanilla set to hit Europe

Following a triumphant product launch in the US, Coca-Cola is preparing for a European roll-out. The soft drink giant is quietly confident that Vanilla Coke will strengthen its European growth. However, cultural differences as well as the movement away from all sodas remain significant obstacles in the European marketplace.

Published By Datamonitor
01 Nov 2002
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Diet confectionery: reaching its full potential in the Netherlands

Published By Datamonitor
10 Jun 2002
ResearchWire
ResearchWire

Gaming: 37% of British adults own a games console

Published By Datamonitor
13 Aug 2001
CommentWire
CommentWire

GM foods: EU agreement doesn't allay consumer fears

Published By Datamonitor
19 Feb 2001
CommentWire
CommentWire

GM foods: give it time

After a five year long moratorium on growing and commercializing GM foods, the EU has authorized the entry of a GM product onto the market. European consumers are still unconvinced, and the biotechnology companies behind the products fear the public may reject them. However consumers may learn to accept GM, first in nutraceuticals, and then in mainstream foods.

Published By Datamonitor
02 Dec 2003

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